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Equilibirum: Rimi Yang and Martiros Adalian
Until June 30, 2009

International artist Rimi Yang portrays the Yin and Yang of life and its uncertainties. Her emotional work explores the human psyche and its relation in connecting to polar opposites. Yang’s paintings are both dramatic yet whimsical showing both Eastern and Western influences. Stylistically, she illustrates an attraction as well as repulsion to abstract expression. Her use of thick painted surfaces applied with gestural brushstroke point to the characteristics of abstraction; the attraction. These stylistic elements are reminiscent of artists such as Diego Velasquez and Edouard Manet. Yang’s portraiture is similar to that of Velasquez as both contain heavy use of paint and texture. The same painterly quality is also seen between Manet and Yang.

Phoebe Unwin, Making An Outside Space Theirs
Until July 3, 2009

Phoebe Unwin, a painter who lives and works in London, studied at Newcastle University, Newcastle (1998-2002) and the Slade School of Fine Art, London (2003-2005). In 2008 she had a solo exhibition titled Feelings and Other Forms, at Wilkinson, London; her second solo show at the gallery. In 2007, she had her first solo museumTravel Tea Sets
DomiTea exhibition at Milton Keynes Gallery, Buckinghamshire, UK. Her first solo exhibition in the US titled Making an Outside Space Theirs opens May 23rd here at Honor Fraser.

Todd Hebert and Jennifer Nehrbass Unveil Fresh Bodies of Work in Solo Exhibitions
July 11 until August 15, 2009
Artists’ reception for both solo exhibitions is Saturday, July 11, 5 -7 p.m.

“City and Country” is an exhibition of nine new paintings by acclaimed artist Todd Hebert. In this new series of works, Hebert shifts his focus from the large-scale close-up to long perspectives on smaller canvases. This playing with expected scale produces intimate and captivating works that entrance the viewer with the deft precision of their small details. Hebert embraces the label of “photorealistic Travel Tea Sets
DomiTeasurrealism” that his past work has earned, yet produces something that is altogether subtler and quieter, these new ovals and extended landscapes depicting snowmen, steam trains and dilapidated signs all shrouded in darkness. Still his work retains the same anthropomorphic quality, these inanimate objects encompassing the universal loneliness of night, speaking of isolation, decay and desolation. The iconography Hebert employs suggesting inevitable impermanence, his canvases capturing a fleeting moment just before a firework, a holiday or a season passes and is forgotten.